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Home>Vegetable Seeds>Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard
Beta vulgaris

Although Swiss Chard is a close relative to the beet, it has a small, inedible root.  It is the leafy greens of the plant that are enjoyed for their mild flavors and eaten like spinach and kale.

Swiss Chard has been cultivated for at least 2,000 years and is rich in vitamin A, as well as other vitamins and minerals.  The varieties that we have available are both tasty and beautiful.

Each packet contains one gram, which is approximately 50 seeds.

 Products (Total Items: 6)
 
  
Barese Swiss Chard
Barese Swiss Chard
$1.80
Quantity
Fordhook Giant Swiss Chard
Fordhook Giant Swiss Chard
$1.80
Quantity
Lucullus Swiss Chard
Lucullus Swiss Chard
$1.80
Quantity
Perpetual Swiss Chard
Perpetual Swiss Chard
$1.80
Quantity
Rainbow Swiss Chard (Five Color Silverbeet)
Rainbow Swiss Chard (Five Color Silverbeet)
$1.80
Quantity
Ruby Red Swiss Chard
Ruby Red Swiss Chard
$1.80
Quantity
  
 


Chard has many uses.  Young, tender leaves are eaten fresh as a salad green, or mature leaves can be cook like you would spinach — steamed, boiled or sautéed in a little butter.  You might also want to try them "Southern-style" serving them up with bit of butter, vinegar, and crumbled bacon.

The stalks, after being striped of leaves, can be used fresh as an interesting addition to a vegetable platter.  They can also be prepared as mentioned above and served alone of mixed with the leaves.  If your diet allows, battered and deep fried chunks are tasty.

In spite of their high nutritional value and usefulness, Swiss Chard is not widely cultivated commercially as there seems to be limited market demand for it.