Whipple Dry Bush Bean<br><b>Coming Soon</b>
'Whipple' dry bush bean seeds.

Whipple Dry Bush Bean
Coming Soon

$2.95
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3030961
Whipple

70 to 95 days — Although its exact history seems to have become lost to time, this old family heirloom bean is named after the pioneering Whipple family who raised it and who settled here in Oregon's Willamette Valley in the mid-19th century. Outside the local area, it has remained relatively rare and unknown.

Some folks harvest it at the immature stage as a green bean and others wait until the green shell stage. Allow to fully mature used as a dry bean, it has an excellent, very rich, cooking flavor. The seeds are a pretty purplish-red with little white spots. Each packet contains one ounce, which is approximately 40 seeds.
Superb!
My daughter & I grew these beans in our 2013 garden. They were easy to care for with no pest or disease problems and had an outstanding flavor. We've been enjoying them throughout the Winter since we had plenty to store. Will definitely grow these again in our 2014 garden!
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Reviewed by: (Verified Buyer)  from South Dakota. on 1/30/2014
5/5
Easy to grow, great yield
My great grandmother was a Whipple. I grew them in 2014, and gave them very little care except to water them two times per week. A woodchuck pushed dirt over some of the plants, but he didn't eat them. When I harvested them I got 48 oz. from 1-1/2 oz. of seeds planted. I'm looking forward to my first batch of baked beans. In my climate it was 90 days to maturity.
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Reviewed by:  from Sanbornton, NH. on 10/24/2014
5/5
I love this bean!
This is the tastiest bean I have ever tried. I used it in soup and instead of the broth adding flavor to the bean, the bean added flavor to the broth. I might also mention that these beans get huge when cooked so it isn't necessary to use many; I always put in too much. They make a good substitute for kidney beans in any recipe. I've never had success growing dried beans in my climate, so I made a few mistakes. When the beans were ripe (they have beautiful fuchsia pods) I just picked them and dumped them on a table in the garage. I lost a lot to mold that way. I now know to spread them out and put a fan on them to keep the air moving. We get too much rain for me to leave them on the plant to dry. I still got a quart of good beans (dry). The plants gave me no trouble at all and finished producing long before the frost.
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Reviewed by: (Verified Buyer)  from Michigan. on 1/13/2016
5/5
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